Basics: Forces and the momentum principle

**Pre reqs:** [Free Body Diagrams](http://blog.dotphys.net/2008/09/basics-free-body-diagrams/), [Force](http://blog.dotphys.net/2008/09/basics-what-is-a-force/), [Kinematics](http://blog.dotphys.net/2008/09/basics-kinematics/)

The time has come to look at things that are NOT in equilibrium. The most basic question to ask yourself is: *”What do forces do to an object”*? Aristotle would say that forces make things move. Constant forces make things move constantly. Actually, Aristotle said there were two types of motion:

  • Natural motions: These motions don’t need anything to happen, they just do. Example: a rock falling. You don’t need to do anything to it. Example: fire rising. It just rises. (there was more to it than that, but you get the idea).
  • Violent motions: These motions are due to some interaction that forces them from their natural state. The natural state of a cart is to be at rest. If someone pushes on it, it will move. When you stop pushing (stop the violent motion) it returns to its natural state – at rest

I am talking about Aristotle, because these basic ideas are what most people think. If you push something it moves. If you stop pushing, it stops. And these people are correct. The problem is that there is always this extra force that no one thinks about – friction. Without friction, the rules change.

**New Rules (Newtonian ideas)**

If you push something with one force, it changes velocity. If you stop pushing, it stays at a constant velocity.

If you want to test your feelings for force, [try this force game I made on Scratch](http://scratch.mit.edu/projects/rhettallain/285748). The idea is that you need to move the box to the red circle. The arrow keys exert a **force** on the object.

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